Black Chess

BOOK DESCRIPTION

CELESTE ALEXANDER has played the game of life by the rules but must now fight the discrimination blocking her path to independence.  KENNEDY VANCE is searching for love to shield her from this hostile world.  BIANCA MICHAELS is not getting the career recognition she desperately needs.

Bigotry is proudly on display in America, and abuse towards marginalized people appears to be trending.  Celeste teams up with her two comrades to fearlessly navigate the lopsided chessboard of life in search of success and happiness.  They’ve been living in a bubble of progressive minds, and are awakened to the reality of an intolerant world.

How can they survive, strive and thrive in this oppressive society?

BOOK BLURB

“If you have been traumatized or left feeling powerless, watching how beautiful Black people are being treated in America, you are not alone. Author Roberta Roberts has brilliantly presented a strategy in the form of her debut novel, Black Chess. Black Chess is our pain, spit-fire wisdom, and solutions wrapped up in dialogue that is nothing short of break-neck intellect, cascading from the stars on Orion’s Belt. Readers will see themselves, hear themselves, and understand the responsibilities we must commit to if we hope to change this game Black people were never intended to win. I implore each of us who have felt the sting of social injustice to read this book multiple times and recommend it to many others.”

Eartha Watts Hicks
author of Love Changes, selected for 2013 NYCHA/NAACP
Literary Game-Changer Award in Fiction

BOOK EXCERPTS

“Evidently, dreams only come true for kids,” Kennedy scoffed.  “Wish I was still a kid.”

“Me too!” Celeste laughed.  “The problem with growing up is that we stop dreaming.”

“Maturing is about letting go of fantasies and facing reality.”

“The secret to life is dreaming!  Everything begins as a thought.  Everything!”

“Dreaming is not enough,” Kennedy sighed.

“We’re taught not to dream, so we don’t discover our power to create the life we desire.  Try to maintain a child-like, not childish, nature.”